'Deputy PM' Damian Green resigns amid extreme porn allegations

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British Prime Minister Theresa May forced her most senior minister, Damian Green, to resign for lying about whether he knew pornography had been found on computers in his parliamentary office.

"I regret that I've been asked to resign from the government following breaches of the Ministerial Code, for which I apologise", Green said in a letter to May, who said she had accepted his resignation with deep regret.

Mr Green initially denounced the allegations as "completely untrue" and attacked "disreputable political smears from a discredited police officer", but in his resignation letter he admitted police had twice discussed the porn with him and his lawyers.

Green's removal is a bitter blow for Theresa May.

"Thousands" of legal pornographic images were found on a computer during a police raid in 2008, a retired Scotland Yard detective has said previously.

Green's sacking follows the November resignations of Sir Michael Fallon as defence secretary amid Westminster sleaze allegations, and global development secretary Priti Patel over undisclosed meetings in Israel.

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Green thanked his supporters in a Tweet today, saying he was "overwhelmed" by the number of messages from friends, colleagues and constituents.

"I accept that I should have been clear in my press statements that police lawyers talked to my lawyers in 2008 about the pornography on the computers, and that the police raised it with me in a subsequent phone call in 2013", he said.

In the statements, Green suggested he was not aware that indecent material had been found on his computers.

The following day she referred it to her independent adviser on ministers' interests, Sir Alex Allan, who told her on Wednesday that he agreed with the finding that there had been a breach of the ministerial code.

The allegations about pornography were publicly aired by former Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner Bob Quick, drawing a rebuke from the head of the London police, Cressida Dick, who said officers had a duty of confidentiality. The pornography was reportedly found on his computer during a police investigation of government leaks.

He also said he did "not recognise the events [Maltby] described", but apologised because he had "clearly made her feel uncomfortable".

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