Some Montgomery voters will need to cast two ballots in Tuesday's election

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Back in 2014, The Atlantic reported that black and Hispanic citizens nationwide were three times more likely than white citizens to not have the right ID to vote. Lawmakers say the new laws prevented voter fraud.

In general, voter ID laws require specific state-issued forms of identification in order to vote, even if you've voted at that polling location before. The group aims to provide live assistance to voters, and it's unclear how numerous calls were to report voting irregularities rather than simply asking for assistance.

A voting rights group has asked a federal judge to force Alabama to tell people that they could be eligible to vote after previously being disqualified for a felony conviction.

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"Some of these voters are told that they can not vote", Coty Montag, the director of litigation at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, wrote in a roundup on Tuesday afternoon. "Some of these voters are told that they can not vote", said Coty Montag, the director of litigation at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, according to Mother Jones.

Secretary of State John Merrill says it was actually a state record for the number of write-in ballots cast in a U.S. Senate Election. "Others are being given provisional ballots". According to the ACLU, 34 states have identification requirements, with seven of them requiring photo IDs. The awareness campaigns in Alabama were aimed at people who might not have the right IDs. They paint a portrait of a state that still appears to be wrestling with voter suppression after a long civil rights struggle seeking to end these practices in the state. "That ballot is scanned and they destroy [the ballots] after the election".

The Secretary of State also addressed the question of a recount. Former Gov. Robert Bentley said the decision would mostly affect first-time Alabama drivers, not voters.

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