Facebook pilots new revenge porn measures in Australia

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Facebook is asking users to send them their nude photos in an effort to tackle revenge porn.

In the pilot scheme, users complete an online form outlining their concerns on the e-safety commissioner's website - and it notifies Facebook of the situation.

In a statement on the trial, Facebook said: "This is an initial pilot in Australia".

Once Facebook receives notice of the image, their community operations team will use image-matching technology to prevent the image from being uploaded or shared online.

NY lawyer Carrie Coldberg, who specialises in sexual privacy, told The Guardian: "We are delighted that Facebook is helping solve this problem - one faced not only by victims of actual revenge porn but also individuals with worries of imminently becoming victims".

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"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly", she told ABC News. They're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies.

The social media giant is testing out a new initiative that they hope will help them to crack down on revenge porn.

In March, Facebook was embroiled in a scandal when it emerged that a 30,000-strong private members group, Marine United, was routinely sharing images of nude women. The program will be tested in Australia first, followed by the U.S., U.K., and Canada, the Times of London reported.

If a user thinks she might be a potential revenge porn target, she contacts e-Safety, which then instructs the user to upload any suggestive photos and/or videos she thinks might be used against her into Facebook Messenger.

"To prevent adversarial reporting, at this time we need to have humans review the images in a controlled, secure environment", Stamos further explained on Twitter.

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