Send your nude images to Facebook to stop revenge porn

Adjust Comment Print

The social media giant is testing new technology in Australia that may help combat revenge porn. In a measure to prevent such incidents, Facebook wants users to upload nude pictures of themselves on messenger.

In the Australian pilot, users must first complete an online form on the e-safety commissioner's website outlining their concerns. This new method requires users to send their own nudes to themselves through the company's Messenger app. The company says it won't store the photos but instead create a digital footprint so that its image-matching technology can prevent any future uploading of a copy of the photograph. Facebook, Twitter and Google all use the the same hash database to identify and remove illegal images. Before you tantalize him with those curves, send the image to yourself via Messenger and flag it "non-consensual intimate image".

In 2015, it became illegal in Wales and England to share private or sexual images or video without the subject's permission, and as of April 2017, 206 people were prosecuted under these new rules.

As per a report in the Australia Broadcasting Corp, it is partnering with an Australian government agency to prevent such image-based abuses. The sender is then also recommended to delete the image.

United Kingdom auto sales in October down for seventh consecutive month
The UK auto recession skidded on last month amid continued soft business and consumer confidence. Dealers reported 10% fewer private buyers taking delivery of new cars in October.


In a statement shared with Newsweek, one law firm said the initiative could make a big impact on addressing the issue, so long as Facebook is able to properly secure the naked images and videos that are sent to it. For protection against "revenge porn", the Telegraph reported.

"Conceptually the idea has merit but it would work better if the user was provided a self-service tool to accomplish the task and upload the file up to a Facebook portal", One Identity EMEA director, Andrew Clarke told Infosecurity.

A team of specially trained representatives from Facebook's community operations team will then review the image to decide whether it should be taken down. CNBC reports Facebook's anti-revenge porn pilot program is available in the USA, U.K., and Canada. The World Bank estimates that 78.2 percent of the US population uses the internet, meaning that 10.9 million Americans (roughly the populations of New York City and Los Angeles combined) are revenge porn victims.

"Revenge porn is a huge problem and Facebook could be held liable for it, so they are trying to do something".

Comments