Google introduces the Search Lite app for slow connections

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Google is testing a new app which provides a version of its search service created to consume less data and perform faster, according to a report from Android Police.

Google has apparently begun showing ads in Indonesia asking users to try out a new experimental search app. This app will help users consume less data by providing offline saving just like YouTube. So, it is a good step from Google that they have launched a new light app for its Search. Users can also force Search Lite to only show them lite web pages, forcing all sites to go through Google's Lite Mode. It is specifically created to offer users instant access to options such as "news", "weather", and "nearby", along with image search, offline pages, and bookmarked pages.

Given the current refined stage of the app, it's likely that the app will be rolling out to select developing markets sooner than later.

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This appears to be targeting emerging markets that lack the mobile data infrastructure that nations like the United States have, similar to the YouTube GO app introduced earlier this year. It will also have various sections like translation, news among others. Now, the company is reportedly testing a lighter version of its Search app.

If you are curious about the app and you want to test you have to be in Indonesia in order to view the app on the Play Store. We are yet to see an official announcement of the app by Google. The Alphabet Inc-led company has been working towards a low-data version of its Android software system as well, called 'Android Go.' All of these activities fall in line with Google CEO, Sundar Pichai's vision of reaching the 'next billion users'.

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